CHEDDAR BAY'S IRISH RECIPES 2008

CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE

1 (4 lb) corned beef brisket
1 onion
3 whole cloves
4 parsley sprigs
8 whole black peppercorns
2 lbs. cabbage
1 c. sour cream
1 T. prepared horseradish

Peel onion and stick with cloves. Put corned beef, onion parsley and peppercorns in a large pot and cover with water. Cover, bring to a simmer and cook gently until tender, 2-1/2 to 3 hours. Cut cabbage into wedges and core. Add to the pot, cover and simmer until tender, about 30 minutes. Combine sour cream with horseradish. Serve the meat and cabbage with some of the broth ladled over all and the horseradish on the side. Serves 8.

SHEPHERD'S PIE

2 c. cooked chopped meat
1 T. finely chopped onion
2 c. gravy
Salt and pepper
2 c. mashed potatoes, prepared with milk & seasonings
Salt & pepper
1/8 tsp. paprika
1 T. butter

Combine meat, gravy, and chopped onion; season with salt and pepper to taste. Line the bottom of a buttered baking dish with a layer of half of the seasoned mashed potatoes. Add meat mixture then cover with remaining mashed potatoes. Or meat and gravy can be put in the baking dish first then topped with all of the mashed potatoes. Dot mashed potato topping with butter, sprinkle with salt, pepper and paprika, then bake for about 30 minutes at 400°, or until potato topping is browned and the Shepherd's pie is thoroughly heated. Serves 4.

IRISH BREAD

3 c. flour
1/2 c. sugar
3 tsp. baking powder
1 c. milk
1 egg, beaten
1 tsp. vanilla
3/4 c. raisins

Mix dry ingredients. Mix egg and milk. Pour egg/milk mixture, raisins and vanilla over dry mixture. Stir well; fold over once or twice on floured board with floured hands. Shape into round loaf and place in greased 9-inch round pan. Bake at 350° for 35 to 40 minutes. Remove from oven. Butter top; place on rack to cool. Serve while still warm.

IRISH STEW

1/4 c. olive oil
1-1/4 lb. stew beef, 1-inch pieces
6 large garlic cloves, minced
8 cups beef broth
2 T. tomato paste
1 T. sugar
1 T. dried thyme
1 T. Worcestershire sauce
2 bay leaves
2 T. (1/4 stick) butter
3 lbs. (7 c.) russet potatoes, peeled
& cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 large onion, chopped
2 c. peeled carrots, 1/2-inch pieces
Salt and Pepper
2 T. chopped fresh parsley

Heat olive oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add beef and sauté until brown on all sides, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and sauté 1 minute. Add beef stock, tomato paste, sugar, thyme, Worcestershire sauce and bay leaves. Stir to combine. Bring mixture to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, then cover and simmer 1 hour, stirring occasionally.

While the meet and stock is simmering, melt butter in another large pot over medium heat. Add potatoes, onion and carrots. Sauté vegetables until golden, about 20 minutes.

Add vegetables to beef stew. Simmer uncovered until vegetables and beef are very tender, about 40 minutes. Discard bay leaves. Tilt pan and spoon off fat. Salt and pepper to taste. Cool slightly. Refrigerate uncovered until cold, then cover and refrigerate. Bring to simmer before serving. Transfer stew to serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley & serve. Serves 4-6.

OLD-FASHIONED IRISH STEW

2 lbs. beef cubes for stew
1 onion, finely chopped
2 stalks celery, finely chopped
1 bay leaf
2 lg. potatoes, peeled & cut into chunks
3 lg. carrots, peeled & sliced
1 (16 oz) bag frozen peas
2 cans beef broth
2 (8 oz) cans tomato sauce
Flour in a plastic bag
2 T. cooking oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Add beef cubes to flour in bag and shake until cubes are coated with flour. Heat oil in large pot. Add celery, onion and bay leaf. Saute until onions and celery are translucent but not browned. Add the beef a little at a time to the pan and brown beef completely. Add beef broth and tomato sauce. If necessary, add enough water to cover beef. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to simmer. Cover pot and cook for 1-1/2 to 2 hours until beef is tender. Add carrots and potatoes. Cook 1/2 hour until vegetables are tender. Add frozen peas. Cook 5-10 minutes until peas are tender.

HAGGERTY
(Traditional Irish Vegetable Dish)

3 medium potatoes
1 large onion
2 T. Bacon fat
1/2 c. grated cheddar cheese
Salt & pepper to taste

Wash and peel potatoes and cut into paper thin slices. Pat dry with towel. Cut onion into paper thin slices. Heat half of the bacon fat in a heavy frying pan and fill the pan with alternate layers of potatoes, onions, and cheese, finishing with potatoes. Sprinkle each layer with salt and pepper. Dot the final layer with remaining bacon fat. Cook over moderate heat until potatoes are almost tender. Turn the Haggerty carefully onto a plate and then carefully slide it back into the pan and continue cooking until done. To serve, cut into wedges and serve with a dollop of sour cream. Serves 6.

LEPRECHAUN DUST

Jello instant pistachio pudding
Baby food jars
Spoons
Milk

Place 1 T. of leprechaun dust (the instant pudding) in a jar (1 jar per child). Add 1/4 cup of milk. Place cap on the jar and have your little leprechauns shake away!

(Adding the milk to the instant pudding turns it green!!! The kids love it!!!)

LEPRECHAUN SHAKE

8 scoops vanilla ice cream
4 c. milk
12 drops green food coloring
chocolate syrup

Put ingredients into blender. Blend until smooth and green color is even. Pour into a glass. Drizzle with chocolate syrup and stir gently. Serves 4

ST. PATRICK'S PUNCH

1/2 gallon lime sherbet
2 liter 7-up or Sprite

Let the sherbet soften in the refrigerator for about 1 to 2 hours before preparing.

Mix sherbet & soda in punch bowl or large mixing bowl with a hand mixer on medium speed until well blended.

Serve immediately or chill in the refrigerator.

SOME IRISH BLESSINGS ...

A LITTLE ABOUT THE SHAMROCK

The Shamrock (traditional spelling: seamróg, meaning summer plant) is a three-leafed clover that grows in Ireland.

A common image in Celtic artwork, the shamrock is found on Irish medieval tombs and on old copper coins, known as St. Patrick's money.

The plant is also reputed to have mystic, even prophetic powers. For instance the leaves are said to stand upright to warn of an approaching storm.

Legend has it that St. Patrick used the shamrock in the fifth century to symbolize the divine nature of the trinity when he introduced Christianity to Ireland.

The Irish Wolfhound:

   

The Irish Setter:

   

The Irish Water Spaniel:

   

And some Famous Irish ...

       

       

       

       

       

You are listening to
When Irish Eyes Are Smiling


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